Reporting of hate crime stats in Alaska spotty

    An analysis by The Associated Press shows reporting of hate crime statistics by local law enforcement agencies in Alaska to the FBI has been spotty, with eleven departments filing no reports between 2009 and 2014 and gaps in reporting by many others.

    JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — An analysis by The Associated Press shows reporting of hate crime statistics by local law enforcement agencies in Alaska to the FBI has been spotty, with eleven departments filing no reports between 2009 and 2014 and gaps in reporting by many others.

    The departments that made no reports are in small, rural communities, like Galena, a river community in Alaska's Interior that has seen a churn in staff. Galena currently has only one officer, who has been on the job since January.

    Departments with gaps of at least two years are in a mix of rural and urban communities, including Fairbanks, Juneau and Bethel.

    Reporting of suspected hate crimes isn't mandatory. The FBI encourages it from law enforcement agencies whose officers are empowered to make arrests even if that means recording zero.

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