The Latest: Governor calls special session

    Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is calling state lawmakers into a special session after they failed to reach agreement on a budget deal ahead of a constitutional meeting deadline.

    Posted Thursday, May 19th, 2016 5:06am by Lance David

    JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — The Latest on the extended Alaska legislative session (all times local):

    The Latest: Alaska governor calls special session

    12:50 a.m.

    Alaska Gov. Bill Walker is calling state lawmakers into a special session after they failed to reach agreement on a budget deal ahead of a constitutional meeting deadline.

    The special session is scheduled to begin Monday in Juneau.

    Bills on the agenda include the budget, oil and gas tax credits, a proposal to allow for structured annual draws from Alaska Permanent Fund earnings and taxes.

    Also on the agenda are bills dealing with adoption, health insurance rates and medical insurance coverage for survivors of peace officers and firefighters.

    House majority leaders expressed frustration that lawmakers were not able to come to terms on the budget. Legislative leaders had hoped to be able to pass the budgets before going into any special session dealing with revenue measures.

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    11:55 p.m.

    Alaska lawmakers faced a special session after failing to reach agreement on a budget deal ahead of a constitutional meeting deadline.

    The House late Wednesday fell shy of the votes needed to draw out the already extended session by up to 10 days before lawmakers adjourned, setting the stage for a special session.

    Republican legislative leaders had hoped to secure passage of the budgets before going into any special session to deal with revenue measures.

    But minority Democrats sought resolution on oil and gas tax credit legislation and said they'd prefer to go to a special session, focused on a select number of issues.

    The House rejected the Senate rewrite of tax credit legislation Wednesday night.

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    9:30 p.m.

    The Alaska House has rejected the Senate rewrite of an oil and gas tax credit bill.

    The vote came late Wednesday, on what was scheduled to be the last day of an extended regular session.

    The Senate rewrite would phase out credits for Cook Inlet, impose a tax on Cook Inlet oil and limit a tax break for oil from newer North Slope fields.

    It didn't go as far as the House version in addressing North Slope credits, and it didn't raise the minimum tax on North Slope producers as Walker recommended and minority Democrats pushed for.

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    9 p.m.

    The Alaska House failed to secure sufficient support to extend the regular session by up to 10 days, virtually guaranteeing a special session.

    The constitution allows for regular sessions of 121 days, a mark reached on Wednesday. It also gives lawmakers the option to extend for 10 days, with a two-thirds vote of each chamber.

    The House fell one vote shy of that threshold Wednesday night.

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    3:55 p.m.

    Unincorporated communities would have the ability to hold elections to decide whether to prohibit legal marijuana businesses under a bill passed by the Alaska Legislature. Unincorporated communities outside of organized boroughs also would be able to hold elections to reverse any prohibitions they might enact.

    Current law allows local governments to bar pot businesses through voter initiative or ordinance, but it doesn't address so-called established villages. Marijuana regulators had sought clarity surrounding that issue.

    The bill, which passed the Legislature on Wednesday, also imposes a statewide household limit of 12 marijuana plants.

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    1:45 p.m.

    The Alaska Senate has passed legislation that would phase out credits but impose a tax on Cook Inlet oil production.

    But the measure does not go as far as the House version in addressing North Slope credits.

    The 14-6 Senate vote followed an hours-long debate on day 121 of the extended regular session. The House will have to decide whether to agree to the Senate changes.

    The constitution allows for regular sessions of up to 121 days. But lawmakers have the option of extending by another 10 days with a two-thirds vote of each the House and Senate. They also could meet in special session to finish remaining work.

    Senate President Kevin Meyer has said he would like to finish the budgets and credits bill Wednesday.

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    10:30 a.m.

    Alaska lawmakers are trying to finish as much as they can on what is scheduled to be the last day of an extended regular session.

    But they had yet to act on key pieces sought by Gov. Bill Walker to help dig the state out of an estimated $4 billion budget deficit.

    Senate President Kevin Meyer has said he'd like to get the budgets and an oil and gas tax credit bill passed by day's end, if possible. The operating budget wasn't completed as of Wednesday morning.

    Lawmakers blew past the 90-day voter-approved session limit last month and hit the constitutional meeting limit of 121 days Wednesday.

    They can extend for another 10 days, with a two-thirds vote of each chamber. They also could get called into a special session

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